Description of TLD Policies

I. GENERAL TLD POLICIES

E1. In General

The Name.Space Charter

The toplevel global internet namespace is a global commons. With this charter, and in accordance with the People's Communication Charter a fair structure for Self Governance of the Global Internet Namespace is being established.

We believe that no single Government, Corporation, Organization, Group, Individual or otherwise ought to make any exclusive claim to any individual zone in the toplevel and generic second.level or any other generic namespace because exclusive noncompetitive ownership of such namespace harms the public interest. Basic principles of fairness dictate that a generic namespace should serve the greatest public good as a resource, not narrow commercials interests as a trademark.

Names are registered on a first come, first served basis. The party requesting registration of a name is responsible that, to her/his knowledge, the use of a given name does not violate trademark or other statutes.

Registering a domain name does not confer any legal rights to that name and any disputes between parties over the rights to use a particular name are to be settled between the contending parties using existing legal methods.

The generic toplevel namespace is in the public domain. Registries/registrars managing the global toplevel namespace agree to enter into peering and datasharing agreements insuring the smooth and transparent interoperability of global nameservice, and to further insure a stable and fault-tolerant infrastructure.

No one shall operate parallel namespaces in intranets, virtual private networks, etc. in any manner that interferes with the Global Internet Namespace. This includes, but is not limited to, operating conflicting, redundant or non-unique namespaces that conflict with established global addresses.

Private ownership and branding of generic toplevel domains is not appropriate on the global internet. Any such use shall solely exist in non-global, private intranets and virtual private nets. The right to express oneself in the creation of an internet.name is guaranteed by the the First Amendment to the US Constitution and the People's Communication Charter, and is highly encouraged.

The registration of a name to any group, organization, government, individual, or otherwise constitutes the good faith intent to expeditiously put the name into service as a functional and reliable internet address. Any such address must answer to an Internet active host. Mass registrations can be arranged for legitimate purposes only and not as a means of trademark hijacking, hoarding and speculation, or overreaching attempts at trademark protection. Legitimate purposes are registration and implementation of an internet namespace to identify an individual, idea, product, corporate identity, content, or otherwise. The registrant's right to a given namespace develops through use and practice in accordance with existing laws pertaining to global trade. "Use and practice" in this context means a namespace is put into active service as an accessible Internet site providing content and/or services.

All Registrants' rights to Privacy and Free Expression are guaranteed. All Registries agree to respect Registrants' proprietary information and all information related to registrant's identity, address, and all other identifying and contact information confidential and private unless otherwise specified by the registrant. Information will not be disclosed to any Government, its agents, or to any individual without due process.

The Root.Zone, the "." (Dot) or Root Directory of the Global Internet Namespace is an "essential facility" as that term is defined in US jurisprudence. Therefore it is imperative that any toplevel namespace be included in the list of servers contained in the Root.Zone, or "." file in order for that toplevel namespace to be recognized globally by all Internet hosts. No proposed toplevel namespace shall be refused inclusion into the Root.Zone, or "." file as long as: (1) it will benefit and serve the public interest; and (2) it is managed in accordance with: (a) the applicable Responsible Practice Policies established between individual registries and networks; (b) the provisions set forth herein; (c) the People's Communication Charter; and (d) US laws.

Registries, whether for profit or non-profit, manage the Internet Global Toplevel Namespace in the public interest. This obligates them to provide highly reliable services at reasonable costs.

 

E2. TLD Strings

.ads
.agency
.aids
.air
.antiques
.art
.artists
.auction
.audio
.bbs
.books
.cafe
.cam
.card
.cars
.center
.city
.channel
.church
.club
.commerce
.computers
.consulting
.culture
.design
.digital
.direct
.dtv
.dvd
.factory
.fashion
.festival
.fiction
.film
.films
.foundation
.free
.fun
.fund
.funds
.gallery
.games
.gay
.graphics
.group
.guide
.hotel
.help
.history
.index
.insurance
.jazz
.jobs
.lab
.mad
.mag
.magic
.mail
.market
.media
.men
.monitor
.movie
.music
.news
.now
.nyc
.one
.online
.opera
.page
.partners
.people
.planet
.politics
.power
.productions
.projects
.properties
.radio
.records
.school
.service
.sex
.shoes
.shop
.show
.security
.society
.sound
.shareware
.site
.software
.solutions
.soup
.space
.sports
.star
.studios
.sucks
.systems
.tech
.temple
.theater
.time
.times
.toys
.trade
.travel
.voice
.war
.watch
.weather
.women
.world
.writer
.zine
.zone

E3. Naming conventions

Registrations under the TLDs published and operated by Name.Space consist of second-level domains. Name.Space will support capabilities to reserve SLDs and provide third-level sub-domain registrations under reserved SLDs where appropriate or desirable.

E4. Registrars

Name.Space sees an opportunity in doing business with existing "legacy" domain registrars in a way similar to that in which they now interact with Network Solutions. As a wholesale (registry) provider of new gTLDs, Name.Space will form relationships with all interested existing ICANN accredited registrars to resell new gTLDs published and operated by Name.Space as they now do with NSI and "com" , "org" and "net" domains. In addition to the existing "legacy" domain registrars, Name.Space intends to develop a network of global affiliates, partners and resellers to provide services licensed under the Name.Space brand, as well as custom-branded services in which Name.Space provides the technology back-end capabilities under a customer’s brand. To facilitate this, Name.Space will provide secure, easy and low cost access to its registry system to encourage resellers to form partnerships with Name.Space. By making its complete capabilities available to its clients, Name.Space will reduce time to market and lower the barrier to entry by scaling its role as an "Applications Service Provider" to a "Solutions Provider" in accordance to client demand and budget. Name.Space will offer opportunities for resellers to license the Name.Space brand name and technology to provide Name.Space services in their local languages and or to their local communities at an affordable scale. Name.Space will also work with non-profit, community, and cultural groups to set up a domain name partnership to help fund access, training and resources and to bridge the digital divide. All registrars, resellers and licencees of the Name.Space brand and or technology, and all registrars and resellers who deal with Name.Space Registry will be bound by the policies and contracts set forth by Name.Space with respect to the TLDs that it publishes and operates.

E5. Intellectual Property Provisions

.

E5.1. What measures will be taken to discourage registration of domain names that infringe intellectual property rights?

The agreement between Name.Space and its clients states:

Names are registered on a first come, first served basis. The party requesting registration of a name is responsible that, to her/his knowledge, the use of a given name does not violate trademark or other statutes.

Name.Space does not assume responsibility or liability for any unforseen acts of bad faith on behalf of registrants nor does it assume the role of determining intellectual property rights.

E5.2. If you are proposing pre-screening for potentially infringing registrations, how will the pre-screening be performed?

Famous and well established and recognized trademarks will be checked against all registrations by an automated process that rates the "safety" level of a name before it is registered, with a warning issued to the potential registrant before the application process begins. If the registrant proceeds with a "hot" rated registration, it will then be flagged for manual review and subject to a holding period and possible rejection if proof of rights to use a famous trademark are not produced.

E5.3. What registration practices will be employed to minimize abusive registrations?

Name.Space seeks to minimize the speculative registration of domains by parties whose only purpose is to resell the domain. This practice has led to bad faith registrations and countless disputes. By mandating use of the domain within a reasonable period and forbidding the registration of a domain for the sole purpose of resale, bad faith registrations and cybersquatting can be reduced to a minimum. Remove the incentive to speculate, reduce the potential for abuse. Any unlawful or criminal activities will be reported to proper authorities and further business with abusive individuals will be curtailed.

E5.4. What measures do you propose to comply with applicable trademark and anti-cybersquatting legislation?

It is not the business of the TLD registry to enforce statutes regarding cybersquatting legislation and trademark laws. The registry will however respect any court order with regard to the disposition of a domain name ruled to be in violation of statutes.

E5.5. Are you proposing any special protections (other than during the start-up period) for famous trademarks?

Name.Space has a famous names policy in effect and intends to continue it beyond the startup period. Name.Space has already revoked several obviously infringing registrations such as "amazon.books" and "nbc.sports" among others.

For the TLD "SUCKS." Name.Space has an "inverse" famous names policy. Registrations in the "SUCKS." TLD are reserved for parody and critique and my not be preemptively registered by mark holders, or other targets of critique.

E5.6. How will complete, up-to-date, reliable, and conveniently provided Whois data be maintained, updated, and accessed concerning registrations in the TLD?

Name.Space provides all of its customers of new TLDs a secure, SSL encrypted web based account administration which enables the client to manage all aspects of her account including modifications and updates to their contact information. Whois updates are performed in real time and are instantly reflected when a new search is performed with sWhois. Name.Space maintains a free publicly accessable sWhois search engine via the web at http://swhois.net and http://dns411.com where domain and IP contact data can be searched. A standard port 43 command line sWhois access is also provided free to the public.

E6. Dispute Resolution

Describe the policies for domain name and other dispute resolution. If you are proposing variations to the policies followed in .com, .net, and .org, consider the following questions:

E6.1. To what extent are you proposing to implement the Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy?

Name.Space does not intend to implement the UDRP for the new gTLDs that it publishes and operates.

E6.2. Please describe any additional, alternative, or supplemental dispute resolution procedures you are proposing.

Names are registered on a first come, first served basis. The party requesting registration of a name is responsible that, to her/his knowledge, the use of a given name does not violate trademark or other statutes.

Registering a domain name does not confer any legal rights to that name and any disputes between parties over the rights to use a particular name are to be settled between the contending parties using existing legal methods.

It is not the business of the TLD registry to enforce statutes regarding cybersquatting legislation and trademark laws. The registry will however respect any court order with regard to the disposition of a domain name ruled to be in violation of statutes.

E7. Data Privacy, Escrow, and Whois. Describe the proposed policies on data privacy, escrow and Whois service.

All information submitted during the course of transactions with Name.Space is considered confidential unless agreed to otherwise in advance by persons submitting their data.

Only information required for proper technical functioning of the DNS will be made publicly available unless otherwise agreed to by registrant. Said publicly available data will be freely available through sWhois searches from http://swhois.net, http://dns411.com and from command line queries made to swhois.net via standard port 43.

Registrants may choose not to have their domain names listed in any public directories.

The Name.Space database is not for sale to any third parties.

No private information in the Name.Space database will be disclosed to any third parties, including law enforcement, without due legal process.

Name.Space does not use cookies or other means to track your net usage beyond its site.

Accesses to Name.Space servers are logged and all transactions are logged for internal security and systems performance reasons, and for internal sales performance ratings, and to assess traffic demands and trends, for internal use only. Specific information contained in our log files are never disclosed to any third parties.

Registrants are encouraged to use encryption when sending email, and to register their public key with us when registering thier domian name. This is to authenticate and verify a registrant's identity related to their domain, to protect against unauthorized modifications to the domain, or hijacking. Information related to registrant and public key are kept confidential unless otherwise requested by registrant.

Any and all data that is escrowed will be stored in encrypted form. Only information required for the proper technical functioning of the DNS will be stored "in the clear".

All private information pertaining to customers and their accounts will be kept encrypted and confidential, including when said data is stored with a third-party escrow agent.

E8. Billing and Collection. Describe variations in or additions to the policies for billing and collection.

All domain name registrations must be paid in advance online at the time of registration.

Notifications for renewal of a domain’s term will be sent electronically via email starting at 30 days prior to the expiration of the term. Provisions are made for secure online payments to client’s account via an encrypted SSL web interface. In the event the client does not renew her domain by the expiration date, the domain will be placed on hold for up to 90 days to allow the client first right of refusal to renew the domain before it is released. Domains not claimed or renewed by the 90th day on hold are automatically released back into the available pool of names.

E9. Services and Pricing. What registration services do you propose to establish charges for and, for each such service, how much do you propose to charge?

Name.Space will provide wholesale and retail registration services in the new gTLDs that it publishes and operates.

The standard retail price for a domain name and DNS services for the domain is $30 per year. If a client chooses to provide their own (or their ISPs) DNS services, the price for a registration is $25 per year.

The standard wholesale price for a domain name to registrar/resellers is $6 per year. This requires the registrar to operate their own facilities.

Wholesale price for smaller-scale resellers who buy directly through the Name.Space system, after establishing a wholesaler relationship and account, will pay a graduated scale, based on volume, from $8.50 per year to $12 per year. Those prices include basic DNS resolution services for the domain in the event that no external DNS is established with an ISP.

II. REGISTRATION POLICIES DURING THE START-UP PERIOD

E12. How do you propose to address the potential rush for registration at the initial opening of the TLD? How many requested registrations do you project will be received by the registry operator within the first day, week, month, and quarter? What period do you believe should be considered the TLD's "start-up period," during which special procedures should apply?

There need not be any special measures taken at the initial opening of gTLD registrations. The "rush" is more likely to happen if only a small number of TLDs are recognized in the first instance. The best way to minimize a "rush" is to recognize a large number of gTLDs to allow more choices to more people. Name.Space will only allow one registration at a time and will not support "bulk" registrations, and has no plans to do so. Regardless of how many registrations the Name.Space Registry receives in the first days, weeks, and quarter, the demand is not expected to exceed the system capacity described in the "Technical Capabilities and Plan" secrion of this application.

Name.Space seeks to minimize the speculative registration of domains by parties whose only purpose is to resell the domain. This practice has led to bad faith registrations and countless disputes. By mandating use of the domain within a reasonable period and forbidding the registration of a domain for the sole purpose of resale, bad faith registrations and cybersquatting can be reduced to a minimum. Remove the incentive to speculate, reduce the potential for abuse. These conditions will be included in the domain registration agreement and applies to registrars and registrants alike.

E15. Will you offer any "sunrise period" in which certain potential registrants are offered the opportunity to register before registration is open to the general public? If so, to whom will this opportunity be offered (those with famous marks, registered trademarks, second-level domains in other TLDs, pre-registrations of some sort, etc.)? How will you implement this?

Name.Space has already provided advanced registrations for many "famous" brands and entities over the past two years in a series of special promotions. Name.Space will continue to screen registrations for possible abusive registrations of famous brands in the way that it has already done in the past. Because of this ongoing policy, there is no need for a special "sunrise" period to give advantage to existing domain holders and those with famous trademarks.

IV. CONTEXT OF THE TLD WITHIN THE DNS

A Top Level Domain on its own is meaningless by default, and may acquire its meaning only through use and context. Because of the global nature of the internet and the fact that the internet and the DNS serves many different languages and cultures, it would be nearly impossible to find a total "one definition fits all" for any TLD. For example, the word "gift" in English has a special meaning, that of a "present" that one exchanges on special occasions, etc. In German, that same word "gift" means "poison". To impose a set meaning on a TLD with respect to one language and culture and not another would be short sighted and not in tune with the global and trans-cultural nature of the internet.

A divserse set of gTLDs that are flexible and expressive in meaning according to their use and context is an excellent way to maximize the potential uses of a domain to serve transculturally for commercial as well as cultural and non-commercial interests.

 

V. VALUE OF PROPOSAL AS A PROOF OF CONCEPT

Name.Space believes that new gTLDs are beyond proof of concept. Name.Space has spent the past four years publishing new gTLDs in accordance to market demand, and providing continuous registry operations for new gTLDs.

Name.Space has proven that it is possible to operate registry services for hundreds of gTLDs with over four years of continuous operations, and that it can be done efficiently and with a high degree of automation.

Name.Space has demonstrated its unification of the disparate global whois databases with its registry/registrar aware sWhois Universal Domain Search engine. http://swhois.net.

Name.Space believes that the public is ready and the market is ripe for new gTLDs. Its first hand experience as a new gTLD registry/registrar yields hard data and statistics gathered over four years as publisher and operator of new gTLDs showing strong demand and creative applications for new and expressive gTLDs.

Beyond this proposal, Name.Space has running code and an established client base. Its customers have shown their desire to publish their domains and to use them for legitimate purposes, to publish their content online.

Many of the registrations seem obvious at first glance, generic terms combined with the new TLDs. Some of these may even be speculative, in search of inflating their values in the "aftermarket". But hopefully, those are the minority, and Name.Space seeks to minimize the speculative registration of domains by parties whose only purpose is to resell the domain. Behind a lot of registrations are creative individuals seeking opportunities to try something new in building communities around their domains and in creating new business opportunities, one of them being "niche portals".

Just looking at some of the more creative and descriptive examples of registrations that connect to active web sites says it loud and clear that the public is ready for new gTLDs and have already discovered what they would like to do with them:

abc.news

soccer.mad

repo.history

master.card

market.watch

cbs.news

patsfall.graphics

metropolis.mag

q.media

acoustic.space

conjure.women

meteori.cafe

acronym.soup

balkan.monitor

solway.gallery

info.war

r2.zone

235.media

iper.media

411.magic

nomadmedia.lab

fly.graphics

benchmark.fund

movies.direct

rufus.design

delta.airlines

round.sound

blackout.books

rosepetal.cafe

your.space manage.your.domains